The Poppy

commonpoppy-400

EXT. GARDEN OF A FAMILY HOME – DAY

A grandfather, CLAUDE, putters about the garden, weeding and carefully tending to his flowers.

Behind him, his granddaughter, HENRIETTE, 10, dressed in bright 1970s garb, plays with a wooden airplane, dive-bombing the various plants that come into her toy’s flight path.

Claude smiles at her as she plays.

GRANDFATHER
Be careful not to trample the flowers, Henriette.

HENRIETTE
Grandpa, I know.

GRANDFATHER
When did you get so cheeky, huh?

She giggles and twirls around, swooping her plane with increased intensity.

As she spins around, her foot catches on a clump of dirt and she topples into the
closest flower bed.

Claude rushes over to help her up.

CLAUDE
What did I say about being careful,
sweetheart? Did you hurt yourself?

As he dusts her off, he sees a lone poppy lays crushed into the damp earth where she fell.

In horror, Henriette looks between the flower and Claude.

HENRIETTE
I’m sorry, Grandpa.

Claude doesn’t seem to hear her as he stares into the crumpled redness of the petals.

FLASHBACK TO:

EXT. ROAD – DAY

Two soldiers, dressed in First World War French military uniforms, speed in an open jeep towards a farmhouse in the distance.

PASCAL
Come on, hurry.

CLAUDE
Cover your face.

EXT. FARM HOUSE – CONTINUOUS

Claude and Pascal jump out of the vehicle and rush toward the house, sleeves over their mouths and noses.

They mount the porch and Pascal bangs loudly on the door. A woman’s screams can be heard coming from inside.

PASCAL
Open up, it’s the French army!

The door opens a crack, exposing the eye of a OLDER WOMAN, 60, who x-rays the two with her gaze.

CLAUDE
Ma’am, we must evacuate you.
A poison gas bomb has been released
less than a kilometer from here.

PASCAL
Get your things. You must leave now.

OLDER WOMAN
We can’t leave.

More screams.

CLAUDE
What is going on in here?

Claude pushes the door open, revealing a YOUNG WOMAN laying on a couch in full labor.

She screams again as a contraction takes over her body.

PASCAL
At the very least, get in the basement
and cover your faces with damp cloths.
Come on, Claude, we have to continue
the evacuation.

CLAUDE
We can’t just leave them like this!

PASCAL
We don’t have a choice, man, come on!

Pascal turns to exit, but Claude is frozen to the floor. The young woman stares at him in blood-soaked terror.

CLAUDE
I’m staying here. They need help.

PASCAL
How can you possibly help them?
The cloud is coming. There is no
stopping it, no matter how many
soldiers are standing in the way!

CLAUDE
You go on ahead. I’ll
meet you at the base tomorrow.

PASCAL
Don’t do this! You need to get out of here.

CLAUDE
I will be fine. Go!

Pascal claps Claude on the shoulder before running out the door.

CLAUDE (CONT’D)
We need to get you both
into the basement.

OLDER WOMAN
This way.

The older woman and Claude carry the young woman toward the basement door.

INT. BASEMENT – LATER

The older woman crouches in front of the young woman as she pushes and screams. Claude holds the young woman’s hand.

OLDER WOMAN
Push, Celeste. Push!

CLAUDE
(whispers)
You’re going to be OK. You’re both
going to be OK. It’s all going to be OK.

Claude looks up to a tiny window at the top of the basement wall. Darkness has fallen.

INT. BASEMENT – MORNING

Celeste caresses her sleeping newborn baby, exhausted and sweaty. She looks up to smile at Claude, who smiles back. The older woman has fallen asleep in a chair in the corner.

CLAUDE
I’m going to go check the air.

Claude places a damp cloth over his face, opens the basement door cautiously and heads upstairs.

EXT. FARM HOUSE – CONTINUOUS

Claude exits the front door with the cloth over his face.

It’s a glorious morning, the sun is shining brightly and the air is completely clear.
Slowly, Claude lowers the cloth from his face to take a quick sniff of the air. He takes a deep breath, detecting no gas, and exhales as if the air has breathed new life into him.

Looking down, Claude sees a single poppy growing next to where he stands. He bends down, plucks it and heads back into the house.

INT. BASEMENT – CONTINUOUS

Claude returns. The older woman stirs and wakes as he enters. Celeste coos to her new child.

CLAUDE
Excuse me, ladies, but I have to be going.

They both look up at him with gratitude on their faces.

CELESTE
Thank you for your help.

CLAUDE
I didn’t do anything. You’re
the ones who did all the hard work.

The young woman giggles and the old woman beams at him.

CLAUDE (CONT’D)
I should be the one to thank you.
You reminded me that beauty exists
in these ugly times. This is all I have
to repay you.

Claude hands Celeste the poppy. She takes it from him and smiles. She brushes the soft petals against her baby’s cheek.

CELESTE
What is your name?

CLAUDE
Claude.

YOUNG WOMAN
Then I will name her Claudette.

Claude smiles and exits the basement.

BACK TO PRESENT:

EXT. GARDEN – DAY

HENRIETTE (O.S.)
Grandpa.

Claude looks up from the flower into the puzzled face of his granddaughter.

HENRIETTE (CONT’D)
Are you OK, Grandpa?

CLAUDE
Yes, darling. I’m fine.

Claude grabs his granddaughter, pulling her in for a hug.

HENRIETTE
I’m sorry I ruined your flower, Grandpa.

CLAUDE
It’s OK, honey. Why don’t
we plant some more together?

Henriette squeezes him back as he gives her a kiss on the top of the head and they stroll off together toward the house.

THE END

Collecting Numbers

INT. GROCERY STORE — NIGHT
Aisle after empty aisle gives way to ANNA, 24, pretty as a rose, tough as its thorns. She examines a can of pickled herring. A YOUNG MAN saunters down the aisle toward her. He stops short, picks up a can of pickled herring. Anna looks sideways at him. He is very attractive.

YOUNG MAN
I thought I was the only one.

ANNA
Sorry?

YOUNG MAN
I thought I was the only one
with a craving for pickled herring
in the middle of the night.

ANNA
My mother’s Danish. It’s my comfort food.

YOUNG MAN
My mother’s from Arkansas.
A Big Mac is my comfort food.

ANNA
So why the pickled herring?

YOUNG MAN
I just needed an excuse to talk to you.

Anna cranks up the charm with a sly smile. She turns to face him.

ANNA
Well, then, I suppose I’m glad
my mother’s a Dane.

YOUNG MAN
Me, too.

Anna smiles sheepishly and turns back to the shelf.

YOUNG MAN (CONT’D)
Listen, could I take you out sometime?

ANNA
Why don’t you give me your number?

YOUNG MAN
But how will I know that you’ll call?

ANNA
You won’t.

She hands him a pen and a small slip of paper. He writes out his number. He hands it back. She immediately walks away.

YOUNG MAN
Why don’t you just text me,
so I can have yours, too?

ANNA
I’m sorry, I left my phone at home.

YOUNG MAN
Well, then, hopefully I’ll hear from you.

ANNA
(gesturing at the slip)
Thanks.

YOUNG MAN
You’re welcome.

As she walked away, she pulls out her cellphone and checks the time.

INT. ANNA’S APARTMENT — NIGHT
Anna kicks off her shoes and takes off her coat. She moves towards:

INT. BEDROOM
She takes out the slip of paper, contemplating it.

She moves to the closet, inside which is a dresser. She pulls open a drawer, revealing

INSERT — A collection of hundreds of slips of paper, all with men’s names and phone numbers on them.

She tosses her most recent slip on top.

She thrusts her hand into the drawer and wiggles it around, sighing happily.

INT. COFFEE SHOP — DAY
Anna sits peacefully reading a book. Her hair flies in her face as someone flings open the door. Irritated and choking on her own hair, she sees DANIEL, late 20s, in the doorway. He’s an exceptionally attractive man with an earnest face. She quickly flashes him a sweet smile, which he returns.

He sits down at a table next to her. He conspicuously pulls out a book.

ANNA
Jane Austen?

He looks at her like he’s already won.

DANIEL
Sorry?

ANNA
You’re reading Jane Austen.

DANIEL
What’s wrong with that?

ANNA
Nothing. Just kind of obvious.

DANIEL
Obvious?

ANNA
It’s like carrying around a
puppy or a baby.

DANIEL
So it couldn’t be that I perhaps
enjoy her strong female characters?

ANNA
Doubtful.

DANIEL
Well, what are you reading?

ANNA
Kafka.

DANIEL
So you’re not trying to tell the
world you’re hyper-intelligent and
oh-so-high-maintenance?

ANNA
I love Kafka.

DANIEL
Sure. Whatever.

They simultaneously face away from each other, both in a respective huff.

Anna’s look softens. She turns back to him.

ANNA
I’m sorry.

Daniel turns around, indignance smeared across his face.

ANNA (CONT’D)
I was harsh. I don’t even know you.

DANIEL
It’s alright.

ANNA
Listen. Why don’t you give me
your number and I can prove
to you that I’m not a cold-
hearted bitch some other time?

DANIEL
(softening)
That would be nice. But
why don’t you give me your
number and I’ll call you.

ANNA
I really think you should give me yours.

DANIEL
I insist. Let me call you.

ANNA
No way! Give me yours!

DANIEL
Not a chance in hell!

ANNA
Why are you being so difficult?

DANIEL
Same question!

Anna gets up throwing on her coat.

ANNA
You are the most frustrating
person I’ve ever met.

DANIEL
Clearly you’ve never met yourself!

ANNA
Ugh!

Anna stomps off towards the door.

DANIEL
Good riddance!

ANNA
Go to hell!

Anna leaves. Daniel remains, angry and completely flustered.

INT. BAR — NIGHT
Anna, in a sassy outfit, floats into the room.

She immediately notices Daniel, who is chatting with a YOUNG WOMAN at the bar. The young woman hands Daniel a slip of paper and puts her coat on. She brushes past Anna, almost knocking her on her ass.

Anna waits to be served on the opposite end of the bar. She watches as Daniel seamlessly turns to YOUNG WOMAN #2. The bartender approaches.

ANNA
Gin tonic, please. Double.

Anna can’t contain her shock as woman 2 hands Daniel a slip of paper. Anna stomps over to Daniel as woman 2 makes her way off through the crowd.

Anna taps Daniel on the shoulder. He swings around.

DANIEL
Oh Jesus, you again.

ANNA
I know what you’re doing.

DANIEL
Oh, you know what I’m doing, do you?

Daniel moves to walk away.

ANNA
(calling after him)
You can’t fool me, Mister!

INT. BAR — NIGHT — LATER
Anna flirts with a MAN in one corner of the room. She smiles wide as the man hands over a slip of paper.

Daniel stares at her from across the room. Anna flashes him the slip of paper and a smug grin.

Daniel turns to a LADY waiting for her drink. He shoots Anna an equally smug grin over the lady’s shoulder.

Anna stomps off, leaving the man calling after her.

INT. COFFEE SHOP — DAY
Anna talks to a handsome STUDENT, a pile of books in front of him on the table. Daniel breezes in.

ANNA
(too loudly)
You know, you should give
me your number so we can
talk more about this later.

She hands the student a slip of paper and a pen. She grins at Daniel as the student eagerly writes out his number.

ANNA (CONT’D)
Thanks.

Anna takes the number. She strolls out of the coffee shop, swagger in her step.

STUDENT
Call me!

EXT. PARK — EVENING
Anna saunters through the park. She notices Daniel sitting next to a pretty woman on a bench. The woman holds a pen and slip of paper.

Anna fumes, storming off. Daniel snatches the paper and pen and runs after Anna.

DANIEL
Would you please stop following me?

ANNA
Me following you?

DANIEL
I can’t turn around anymore
without finding you in my face!

ANNA
I was just about to say the same
thing. I see you got that girl’s number.

DANIEL
I did.

ANNA
Well I got nine today.

DANIEL
Pfft. That’s nothing.

ANNA
It’s more than you could ever get.

DANIEL
Leave me alone, I’m serious. And don’t
even think about following me to
Dog’s Bollocks tomorrow night.

ANNA
You bet I won’t.

DANIEL
Whatever.

Daniel starts to walk away.

ANNA
(calling after him)
And stop following me!

INT. DOG’S BOLLOCKS — NIGHT
Anna struts in, looking stunning. She glances around the room. She goes to the bar where a CUTE GUY sits.

Daniel appears, looking great, with a folder under his arm. He sees Anna and heads over.

DANIEL
How did I know.

ANNA
I just wanted to see you
make an ass of yourself.

DANIEL
Well, look who’s the ass now.

He thrusts the folder at her. She opens it. It’s full of girls’ phone numbers.

ANNA
What the hell is this?

DANIEL
It’s you. Losing.

ANNA
You think this is supposed to impress me?
If you could only see my drawer at home.

DANIEL
Well let’s go.

ANNA
You couldn’t handle it. It would
make your pea-brain explode.

DANIEL
I see you’re nothing but a big-talker.

ANNA
Big-talker? Alright, then. Let’s go.

DANIEL
I thought you’d never ask.

ANNA
Argh.

They speed-walk toward the door, pushing each other to get through it first.

INT. ANNA’S APARTMENT — NIGHT
Anna and Daniel burst into her apartment.

ANNA
Get your tail out, smart-ass, cause
you’re walking out of here with it
between your legs.

She pointedly walks into her bedroom.

Daniel throws his folder down on the couch. He looks around the room, smiling at the books on her bookshelf.

DANIEL
Your book collection is so predictable.

Anna stomps back into the room, holding the drawer full of numbers.

ANNA
There, look at this.

DANIEL
You keep your numbers in a drawer?

ANNA
I used to keep them in a
folder until it overflowed.

DANIEL
So you’ve hooked up with all these guys?

ANNA
No.

DANIEL
But you’ve called them.
Gone on dates with them.

ANNA
No.

DANIEL
Ha! I knew it.

ANNA
Knew what?

DANIEL
You’re freakin’ insane.

ANNA
At least I’m not crawling
with disease, Casanova.

DANIEL
Neither am I.

ANNA
You think “STD” is short for “stud”.

DANIEL
No I don’t!

ANNA
That’s not what your
conquest folder says.

DANIEL
I haven’t slept with any of them!

ANNA
Pardon?

DANIEL
I said I haven’t slept with any of them.

ANNA
So you just collect their numbers.

DANIEL
Yes.

ANNA
I knew it!

DANIEL
Knew what.

ANNA
You’re bat-shit crazy!

DANIEL
I’m crazy? You’re crazy!

ANNA
Ha! Crazy crazy crazy!

Daniel grabs the drawer from Anna. He steps to the balcony door and throws it open.

ANNA
What are you doing?

EXT. BALCONY
In one fluid motion, Daniel dumps the contents of the drawer off the balcony.

ANNA
What are you doing?!

DANIEL
You weren’t using them.

Anna grabs his folder. Before Daniel can react, she dumps the contents off the balcony. Paper slips cover the ground like snow below.

DANIEL (CONT’D)
What the hell are you doing?

ANNA
(mockingly)
You weren’t using them.

DANIEL
You are the most infuriating
person I’ve ever met.

ANNA
And you are a hopeless pig.

DANIEL
You’re a frigid cow.

ANNA
Yeah? Well you’re a
goddamned cocksucker.

DANIEL
And you are a total fucking… babe.

ANNA
I hate you so much.

DANIEL
I hate you more.

Anna and Daniel dive at each other, embracing each other in a passionate kiss.

THE END

©Lauren Greenwood 2013

Strong Tears

INT. FLOWER SHOP — DAY

A MAN, mid 30s, enters the shop, head hung. The flower shop ATTENDANT busies herself with an arrangement.

The attendant gives a look of confusion as he walks up to the counter.

ATTENDANT
Can I… help you?

Tears stream down the man’s face. He sobs quietly as he speaks.

MAN
One purple begonia, please.

ATTENDANT
Sure.

The attendant reaches for the flower, handing it to him.

ATTENDANT (CONT’D)
Two dollars, please.

The man sniffles as he pulls the money out of his pocket.

MAN
Thank you.

He turns to leave. The attendant leans over the counter to watch him go.

EXT. PARK — DAY
The man hunches on a bench, sniffing the begonia. His tears wet the petals. An OLD LADY hobbles by, stopping in front of him as she sees him crying.

OLD LADY
Are you alright?

The man stands and hands the old lady the flower.

MAN
Please have this.

OLD LADY
Thank you.

She accepts the flower, smiling as she stares into the bloom. The man walks away.

EXT. FAIR GROUNDS — DAY

The fair is dirty and depressing. People mill about, lost amid the carnival music. The man approaches a BALLOON VENDOR.

BALLOON VENDOR
What’ll it be–

The vendor freezes as he sees the man crying.

MAN
One red balloon, please.

The vendor pulls a red balloon down out of his bunch and hands it to the man.

VENDOR
This one’s on the house.
Looks like you could use it.

MAN
Thank you.

The man turns away, ignoring the balloon. Its presence on his wrist makes him cry harder. The vendor, bewildered, watches the man go as children spring impatiently around his feet.

EXT. CAFE — DAY

The man sits alone on the almost deserted terrace, the balloon standing at attention above his head, tied to his wrist.

A WAITRESS in a brightly colored apron half-skips toward the man’s table. She jovially pokes the balloon before seeing his sad face. She stops smiling.

WAITRESS
Oh dear. Isn’t the
balloon helping?

MAN
Not particularly.

WAITRESS
Would you like something
to drink? A whiskey, perhaps?

MAN
No thank you. I’ll just
take a chamomile tea.

WAITRESS
Sure thing.

She hurries back inside, glancing over her shoulder as she goes.

A MOTHER strolls by with a small GIRL toddling beside her. The girl stops and stares at the balloon.

GIRL
Oh mommy, a balloon!

She glances up hopefully at her mother.

MOTHER
It’s not polite to stare, dear.

GIRL
I want a balloon!

MOTHER
Maybe after dinner,
if you eat your vegetables.

The man leans forward, untying the balloon from his wrist. He hands it to the little girl.

MAN
Vegetables are gross.

The girl jumps with glee as the mother stares indignantly at the man.

MOTHER
I don’t know if I should thank you
or slap you. Come on, sweetie.

The girl is completely lost in her new balloon. Her mother pulls her away. The girl turns back smiling and waving. The man casts his head back down.

The waitress returns with a steaming cup of tea.

WAITRESS
What happened to your balloon?

MAN
It blew away.

WAITRESS
What a shame. Red balloons
are the nicest.

The man starts crying again as he picks up the tea to sip it. The waitress makes her way back inside. Teardrops fall into the man’s tea. He leaves some money on the table and abandons the still full cup.

EXT. STREET — DAY

The man sobs harder to himself as he drags his feet forward with an excruciating effort.

EXT. HOUSE — DAY

The man approaches the front door of a row house. He takes a deep breath, wiping his face with his sleeve. He slaps himself. Once. Twice. Three times.

He puts the key in the lock. Out of nowhere, he grins wide.

INT. FRONT HALLWAY — DAY

The man enters with his over-exaggerated smile.

LITTLE GIRL (O.S.)
Daddy!

A LITTLE GIRL, 6, runs around the corner straight into the man’s arms.

MAN
Hi sweetheart!

LITTLE GIRL
Devon threw up.

The man strides down the hall, little girl in tow.

INT. BOY’S BEDROOM — DAY

DEVON, 9, lays in a hospital bed. Toys mingle with medical equipment on the bedside table. Tubes and wires suspend between his small body and beeping machines.

The man enters, smiling, with the little girl.

DEVON
Hi Dad.

MAN
Hi, sport. How are you feeling?

DEVON
Ok, I guess.

MAN
You’re such a strong kid,
you’ll be just fine.

DEVON
And then we’ll play
baseball again, right, Dad?

MAN
Of course.

LITTLE GIRL
(matter-of-factly)
Daddy, Devon’s too sick to play baseball.

MAN
He just needs some more
time to get better.

The door swings open gently as a WOMAN, late 30s, enters with a small paper cup full of pills and a glass of juice.

WOMAN
How are you feeling, sweetheart?
(to man)
Hi honey.

She gives the man a sweet kiss on the cheek before quickly moving to Devon’s side.

DEVON
Daddy says I’ll be OK.

She glances over at her husband, giving him a tired, hopeless smile.

WOMAN
Of course you will be, my love.

She plants a kiss on Devon’s forehead.

INT. BEDROOM – NIGHT

The woman sits on the edge of the bed, weeping uncontrollably. The man, stone-faced, comforts her.

WOMAN
How do you do it?

MAN
Do what, sweetheart?

WOMAN
Stay so strong?

MAN
I don’t know.

WOMAN
I’m falling to pieces.
And you never seem to cry.

He pulls her close. The woman crumbles under the weight of her tears. The man stares off into the distance, gaze fixed, eyes dry.

THE END

©Lauren Greenwood 2013

Best Date Ever

Best Date Ever

INT. BAR — EVENING

Two guys, JEFF and ADAM, sit at a table. A pitcher of beer and two glasses stand between them.

ADAM
So? How was it?

INT. CAFE — EVENING

Two girls, JULIENNE and CHLOE, sit at a table. A mug of tea rests in each of their hands.

CHLOE
And? How was your date?

EXT. PARK — DAY (FLASHBACK)

Jeff sits on a bench, a large flower in his hand. He fidgets with the flower, sniffs his breath.
Julienne approaches wearily.

JULIENNE
Jeff?

Jeff looks up, smiles broadly.

JEFF
Julienne, right?

Julienne extends a hand. They shake.

JULIENNE
Nice to meet you.

JEFF
Wow, you look even better
than your profile picture!

JULIENNE
Thanks. Uh– you too.

JEFF
So. Oh right! This is for you.

He hands Julienne the flower.

JULIENNE
Thanks. So where are we going?

INT. BAR — EVENING

Jeff exhales loudly.

JEFF
It was… awesome.
Maybe my best date ever.

INT. CAFE — EVENING

Julienne rubs her forehead.

JULIENNE
Horrible. Just awful!

EXT. PARK — DAY (FLASHBACK)

Jeff stands. He is 3 inches shorter than Julienne.

JULIENNE
So, what do you want to do?

JEFF
Your profile says you like art, so
maybe we should go to the gallery?

JULIENNE
That sounds nice.

INT. BAR — EVENING

Jeff pours himself some more beer.

JEFF
She is so smart! She knew
everything about the paintings!

INT. ART GALLERY — DAY (FLASHBACK)

Julienne and Jeff walk slowly in between paintings and sculptures. Jeff stops in front of an Otto Dix painting.

JEFF
God, that’s ugly! I bet I could
paint better than that.

JULIENNE
But that’s the point. It’s
a representation of the
hideousness of post-war
Germany.

JEFF
He could have at least used nicer colors.

JULIENNE
That’s an interesting interpretation.

Julienne walks towards the exit. Jeff follows.

JEFF
Now this kind of modern
art I don’t get at all.

Jeff points to a sign near the door. It says: MAXIMUM CAPACITY 40 PERSONS

JULIENNE
I don’t think this is part of the exhibit.

JEFF
Modern art is shit.

INT. CAFE — EVENING
Julienne throws her hands up.

JULIENNE
It was really embarrassing.
I just wanted to get out of there.

INT. ART GALLERY — DAY (FLASHBACK)

Julienne stands bored and stares at Jeff who is scrutinizing a drinking fountain.

JULIENNE
Should we go?

JEFF
(to himself)
Fucking artists.
(to Julienne)
Ok, let’s go.

INT. BAR
Jeff sips his beer proudly.

JEFF
So I handled myself pretty well.

ADAM
Chicks love cultured dudes.

JEFF
Exactly.

EXT. ART GALLERY — EVENING (FLASHBACK)
Jeff and Julienne stand awkwardly.

JEFF
So you hungry?

JULIENNE
Not really.

JEFF
You’re too skinny! C’mon!

JULIENNE
I should really get going–

JEFF
Pretty please?!

JULIENNE
(resigned)
If you need to beg…

INT. CAFE
Julienne flicks her hair as Chloe sips.

JULIENNE
He could not take a hint.

CHLOE
Can they ever?

INT. DIVE RESTAURANT — NIGHT (FLASHBACK)
Jeff stares are Julienne while she examines the menu.

JULIENNE
I’m sorry, but I can’t eat
any of this. I’m vegan.

Jeff explodes into laughter.

JEFF
I’m sorry. I just thought that was
something they made up for TV.

JULIENNE
No. I actually don’t eat animal products.

JEFF
But why? Animals are delicious!
Waitress! Another beer please!

Julienne rolls her eyes as Jeff grins at her dozily.

INT. BAR
Jeff readjusts himself in his seat.

JEFF
She’s just so different. She’s
like no one I’ve ever dated.

INT. CAFE
Julienne sets her cup down to prove a point.

JULIENNE
He’s a complete animal. Like no
one I’ve ever been out with.

INT. BAR
Adam fills his beer glass from the pitcher.

ADAM
Did you screw her?

INT. CAFE
Chloe pushes her tea cup away.

CHLOE
How’d you get rid of him?

EXT. JULIENNE’S HOUSE (FLASHBACK)

Julienne and Jeff stand in front of the door, Julienne awkwardly so, Jeff confidently.

JEFF
It’s kinda late, I guess I should
probably just crash at your place.

JULIENNE
My mother is staying with me.

JEFF
She can sleep with us, too.

Jeff shoots Julienne an exaggerated wink and laughs to himself.

JEFF (CONT’D)
Seriously though,
can I call you?

JULIENNE
I have your number.

JEFF
Good! Call me.

Jeff tries to kiss Julienne, but she expertly dodges his mouth before heading quickly inside. Jeff takes a deep breath, walks away with a huge smile.

INT. BAR

Jeff leans back, satisfied. Adam stares at him, awestruck.

JEFF
She’ll call.

INT. CAFE
Julienne finishes her tea.

JULIENNE
I already blocked him on facebook.

THE END

©Lauren Greenwood 2013